search
Sections List
American Journal News

Wyoming Republicans invent their own 'science' to try to ban medication abortion

The impact of this type of ban could be especially disastrous for a state as large and sparsely populated as Wyoming.

By Lisa Needham - March 23, 2021
Share
Abortion rights demonstrators

On Friday, the Wyoming Senate that passed a bill seeking to outlaw the drugs used in medication abortions, sending it to the state House for consideration. It’s a move that ignores all available science on the safety of those drugs. 

The impact of a ban, were it to pass, could be especially disastrous for a state as large and sparsely populated as Wyoming. Nearly all abortions performed in the state are medication abortions, and 96% of Wyoming counties have no providers

Having a medication abortion typically involves a two-drug regimen that is highly safe. If the medication is taken before the nine-week mark of a pregnancy, the regimen is 99.6% successful, with a risk of a major complication of only 0.4%. 

A recent study looked at what happens when patients use telemedicine to have medication abortion drugs prescribed and before receiving then receive them by mail. Participants in that study found it to be “safe, effective, efficient, and satisfactory.” Further, the study authors noted that being able to prescribe via by telemedicine and dispense medication by mail could increase abortion access, as it could increase the reach of each provider. 

Another new study looked at what happens when pharmacists, rather than abortion providers, dispense mifepristone. Pharmacists, the study noted, are already able to dispense treatments for erectile dysfunction, even though those drugs are less safe than the ones used for a medication abortion.

The study found that when pharmacists provide the medication it’s similar to when doctors dispense it: The procedure is safe and effective. Of 266 people in the study, only 4 reported any adverse event, and the study determined that none of those events were related to the fact a pharmacist dispensed the drugs. 

Just as important, the study looked at whether patients felt satisfied with having a pharmacist dispense the pill. Over 90% of patients said they were, and nearly 70% said they’d recommend the process to a friend seeking an abortion. 

The biggest concern expressed by study participants was that of wait times — waiting for a pharmacy to dispense a prescription can sometimes be time-consuming, but that’s not in any way related to the actual procedure. 

Anti-abortion politicians in Wyoming have much of this information at their disposal, particularly as doctors testified to a Senate committee about the drugs’ safety and when they’re used. Jackson, Wyoming-based family medicine provider Dr. Katie Noyes explained that medication abortions can only occur up to the 10-week mark of pregnancy, well before a pregnancy is developed. 

Rather than listening to the science, GOP state Sen. Tim Salazar, the bill’s sponsor, instead invented a fictional horror story about the effects of medication abortion drugs. 

Salazar called  the use of the drugs  “cruel and unusual” and said it imposes “a barbaric death sentence carried out by chemically induced starvation.” 

However, factually speaking, there’s no way in which blocking pregnancy hormones and inducing cramping and bleeding can be considered “starvation.” As Dr. Noyes explained, the drugs don’t even block blood flow to the uterus, only the hormone. 

There’s an additional problem with Salazar’s anti-science stance. Dr. Rene Hinkle, a Wyoming ob-gyn, testified against the bill and pointed out that the same drugs used for medication abortion drugs are sometimes used in the event of a miscarriage. That’s because performing a medication abortion and helping someone complete a miscarriage is medically identical, said Hinkle.  Were the drugs to be outlawed for abortions, physicians might hesitate to use them for miscarriages. The measure imposes a misdemeanor punishment of up to six months in jail and a $750 fine.

Removing the option of a medication abortion won’t decrease the need for abortions, said Dr. Noyes. It will just shift demand, requiring people to travel further and undergo lengthier procedures — all because some legislators don’t believe in science. 

 


AJ News
Get the latest news here first.

Tai News

Newsletter
Read More
Cannabis workers across Missouri begin push to unionize dispensaries 

Cannabis workers across Missouri begin push to unionize dispensaries 

By Rebecca Rivas - December 04, 2023
Curtis Hertel Jr. places public service over politics in Michigan congressional run

Curtis Hertel Jr. places public service over politics in Michigan congressional run

By Alyssa Burr - October 20, 2023
Republican Virginia Senate candidate Danny Diggs has ties to hate groups and extremists

Republican Virginia Senate candidate Danny Diggs has ties to hate groups and extremists

By Josh Israel - October 20, 2023
Demands grow for Wisconsin Supreme Court to redraw the state’s legislative maps

Demands grow for Wisconsin Supreme Court to redraw the state’s legislative maps

By Rebekah Sager - October 19, 2023
Pennsylvania elections 2023: A voter’s guide to the state Supreme Court race

Pennsylvania elections 2023: A voter’s guide to the state Supreme Court race

By Anna Gustafson - October 19, 2023
Pennsylvania elections 2023: What to know before you vote

Pennsylvania elections 2023: What to know before you vote

By Anna Gustafson - October 18, 2023
AJ News
Latest
Republican David McCormick invests millions in website that platforms Holocaust denial

Republican David McCormick invests millions in website that platforms Holocaust denial

By Jesse Valentine - February 09, 2024
Lawmakers will again take up bills expanding, tightening gun laws

Lawmakers will again take up bills expanding, tightening gun laws

By Annmarie Timmins, New Hampshire Bulletin - January 31, 2024
UAW delivers rousing presidential endorsement for Biden over ‘scab’ Trump

UAW delivers rousing presidential endorsement for Biden over ‘scab’ Trump

By Ashley Murray, States Newsroom - January 24, 2024
Republicans Sam Brown and Jeff Gunter sling mud in Nevada senate primary

Republicans Sam Brown and Jeff Gunter sling mud in Nevada senate primary

By Jesse Valentine - January 17, 2024
A Young Texas Woman Almost Died Due To The Texas Abortion Bans – Now She’s Battling To Save Other Women

A Young Texas Woman Almost Died Due To The Texas Abortion Bans – Now She’s Battling To Save Other Women

By Bonnie Fuller - January 10, 2024
Health care legislation preview: Maryland advocates want to focus on access, patients in 2024 session

Health care legislation preview: Maryland advocates want to focus on access, patients in 2024 session

By Danielle J. Brown, Maryland Matters - January 08, 2024
How GOP senate hopefuls try to excuse the  January 6 insurrection

How GOP senate hopefuls try to excuse the  January 6 insurrection

By Jesse Valentine - January 05, 2024
NH lawmakers will be taking up major voting bills this year. Here are some to watch for.

NH lawmakers will be taking up major voting bills this year. Here are some to watch for.

By Ethan DeWitt, New Hampshire Bulletin - January 04, 2024
Republican US Senate candidates want to make Trump’s tax cuts permanent 

Republican US Senate candidates want to make Trump’s tax cuts permanent 

By Jesse Valentine - December 22, 2023
Rand Paul went all in on the Kentucky governor’s race. It didn’t work.

Rand Paul went all in on the Kentucky governor’s race. It didn’t work.

By - December 15, 2023
Texas governor and attorney general do little to curb state’s chemical plant crisis

Texas governor and attorney general do little to curb state’s chemical plant crisis

By Jesse Valentine - December 08, 2023
Likely GOP Senate candidate Eric Hovde proposed tax hike for poorer workers and retirees

Likely GOP Senate candidate Eric Hovde proposed tax hike for poorer workers and retirees

By Jesse Valentine - December 07, 2023
Whitmer signs specific criminal penalties for assaulting health care workers into law

Whitmer signs specific criminal penalties for assaulting health care workers into law

By Anna Liz Nichols, Michigan Advance - December 06, 2023
105 Republicans voted to expel Santos for things Trump has also done

105 Republicans voted to expel Santos for things Trump has also done

By Jesse Valentine - December 05, 2023
For Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, another Trump term is another chance to kill Obamacare

For Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, another Trump term is another chance to kill Obamacare

By Jesse Valentine - December 04, 2023
Florida Sen. Rick Scott backs Donald Trump in revived push to repeal Obamacare

Florida Sen. Rick Scott backs Donald Trump in revived push to repeal Obamacare

By Jesse Valentine - November 30, 2023
Tate Reeves took donations from power company that hiked customer rates

Tate Reeves took donations from power company that hiked customer rates

By Jesse Valentine - November 06, 2023
Daniel Cameron ran on depoliticizing the Kentucky AG’s office. He made it more political.

Daniel Cameron ran on depoliticizing the Kentucky AG’s office. He made it more political.

By Jesse Valentine - November 03, 2023
Republican operatives sound every alarm on current trajectory of 2023 governor’s race

Republican operatives sound every alarm on current trajectory of 2023 governor’s race

By Adam Ganucheau, Mississippi Today - October 24, 2023
Key takeaways from Monday’s U.S. Senate Ohio Republican primary debate

Key takeaways from Monday’s U.S. Senate Ohio Republican primary debate

By Nick Evans, Ohio Capital Journal - February 20, 2024
Human, financial costs of gun violence are growing dramatically, health care group says

Human, financial costs of gun violence are growing dramatically, health care group says

By Marty Schladen, Ohio Capital Journal - February 20, 2024
Mark Robinson gun raffle raises campaign finance questions

Mark Robinson gun raffle raises campaign finance questions

By Jesse Valentine - February 16, 2024
Abortion care and transgender health care are ‘parallel struggles’ in 2024 legislation

Abortion care and transgender health care are ‘parallel struggles’ in 2024 legislation

By Danielle J. Brown, Maryland Matters - February 16, 2024
Ohio Democrats introduce education bills for universal school meals, teacher pay raises

Ohio Democrats introduce education bills for universal school meals, teacher pay raises

By Susan Tebben, Ohio Capital Journal - February 15, 2024
Democrats dominate in getting bills to become laws, with leadership snagging the most wins

Democrats dominate in getting bills to become laws, with leadership snagging the most wins

By Dana DiFilippo, New Jersey Monitor - February 15, 2024